Category: Process

Pinterest Country Boards

Pinterest Country Boards

After two weeks of tags I’m finally back with a worldbuilding post. I’m also promoting Pinterest again, because Pinterest is awesome and I use it for all sorts of writing-related things. (No, they didn’t pay me.)

I’m not sure Pinterest is really something most people think about as a worldbuilding tool, but it’s wonderful for that purpose anyway, particularly for visual people, so here’s a look at how I set up my Pinterest character boards. Continue reading “Pinterest Country Boards”

My Editing Process

My Editing Process

Over the past week I’ve been working on editing The Heart of the Baenor (which I really, really need to come up with a new title for) and figuring out what editing system works for me. This post will be similar to my story binder post, taking you through the system I’ve developed for myself, and hopefully it will help out some of you with your own revisions. Continue reading “My Editing Process”

T: Timeline Uses in Fiction

T: Timeline Uses in Fiction

Timelines are handy little tools. You often have to develop them in school (at least I have) with all the different birthdays of famous people and special events marked out and whatnot (I hate putting together school timelines). But what use do they have in fiction? Well, quite a few. (And I’m not counting historical fiction in this post.) Continue reading “T: Timeline Uses in Fiction”

P: Potential Energy

P: Potential Energy

Many of us authors have way more ideas than we know what to do with, and not only that, but they tend to come at the most inopportune times. With so many ideas, how do we know which to follow and which to leave?

‚ÄčKnow How Many Projects You Can Write At Once

This will obviously affect how many ideas you can follow at once. I used to work on something like half a dozen projects at a time, until Continue reading “P: Potential Energy”

O: Overambitious Goals

O: Overambitious Goals

Goal-setting can be both exciting and stressful. Generally we make these at the beginning of the year, promptly forgetting about them or going off the rails. We also make smaller-scale goals for smaller aspects of our life, and generally these are easier for us to reach but we’re still not perfect. I’m largely talking in this post about the former type, but this also applies to the latter type for those of us who tend to go for overachieving at times or wrongly estimate how much time we’ll have to do things.

First, how do we Continue reading “O: Overambitious Goals”