Tag: Worldbuilding

Pinterest Country Boards

Pinterest Country Boards

After two weeks of tags I’m finally back with a worldbuilding post. I’m also promoting Pinterest again, because Pinterest is awesome and I use it for all sorts of writing-related things. (No, they didn’t pay me.)

I’m not sure Pinterest is really something most people think about as a worldbuilding tool, but it’s wonderful for that purpose anyway, particularly for visual people, so here’s a look at how I set up my Pinterest character boards. Continue reading “Pinterest Country Boards”

Worldbuilding Based on Ancient History

Worldbuilding Based on Ancient History

Ancient history is something I enjoy studying, but it wasn’t until this past school year when I was studying it again and also reading The Light of Eidon by Karen Hancock that I considered the idea of building a world based on it, and I’ve realized since starting just how much I was missing out on. Ancient history is a treasure trove of cultures and details, and it can be a lot of fun to live vicariously through your worldbuilding research. Here are some of the benefits of basing a world on ancient history. Continue reading “Worldbuilding Based on Ancient History”

Camp NaNo Prep: The World

Camp NaNo Prep: The World

Second to characters, the world is what generally catches a reader’s interest in a story, assuming it’s done well. The world affects the characters and outline (at least to some extent), so it shouldn’t be neglected.

Now, I speak as a speculative fiction writer, so all of my stories take place in worlds that are at least somewhat fictionalized (even my contemporary stories don’t adhere to specific real-life places most of the time), but this is at least somewhat applicable to all settings. Continue reading “Camp NaNo Prep: The World”

Wildlife in Worldbuilding

Wildlife in Worldbuilding

Fun fact: I used to HATE developing wildlife for worldbuilding. It fact, I loathed it so much that I just altogether avoided it. Until I found this post by Hannah at Ink Blots and Coffee Stains and realized it didn’t have to be as hard as I was making it. I didn’t have to make everything up from scratch. Now I really enjoy developing new creatures. Plants are a bit trickier and I generally don’t develop those unless I have a very specific purpose in mind for them (for instance, they produce a certain color of dye), but creatures I can do. (You should check out Hannah’s post for more info on plants, because she actually gives them a whole section rather than a measly single point like I did.) So here are some things to consider when developing fictional wildlife. Continue reading “Wildlife in Worldbuilding”